An infectious faith?

Imagine what life would be like if we had an infectious faith as virulent as the more notorious infectious diseases of our era? When I began to think about that in response to the release of a friend’s new book, I was reminded of images like this… which was seen during the outbreak of the bird flu in China. We go to incredible lengths to protect ourselves from such diseases that if you ever walk into a doctor’s office and have the flu or a cough, there are a stack of masks waiting for you to wear so you can prevent spreading your germs to others. With infectious diseases that are airborne, what is the one, extremely powerful action of ours that we are most afraid of? The sneeze! Something so natural and simple, and yet so deadly when it disperses germ microbes into the air.

Now, let’s return to my question above. Imagine if our faith was like that… that because of how we live it out, or how we talk about it, or even how we think about others, God, and life, people can’t resist wondering with what we are “infected.” Obviously, we don’t think of faith that way… and maybe that’s the problem. Maybe we have spent so much time intellectualizing our faith that we forget that our faith (whatever that is) shows just like a sneeze that can’t be resisted. When someone sneezes around you, what’s the first thing you think? “I hope he or she doesn’t have a cold because I don’t want to get it!” Imagine for a moment that our relationship with Jesus shows in such a way that someone around us can’t help but think… “there’s something different about her, I wonder if it is his or her faith?”

I want to recommend for your consideration a book that will be coming out soon entitled “Sneezing Jesus.” (www.sneezingjesus.com) Yes, I know, it’s a little different for a title, but I can unequivocally say that this book paints a picture of Jesus and our relationship with him in a way that will resonate with your soul. Brian Hardin, the founder of Daily Audio Bible, takes us on a journey into the remarkable nature of Jesus as not only human but God. It is never an easy “needle to thread” between emphasizing Jesus humanity over His divinity, or vice versa. I believe having had the opportunity to review (and endorse this

book) that this book arrives just in time for those of us who are wondering what a “relationship with Jesus” REALLY means. And if this relationship matters to me, how does it change me and what I pass on (“sneeze?”) to others.

If you review the accounts of Jesus’ disciples and their disciples (such as Peter and John Mark), you will find that these people were changed as a result of being in relationship with the people who had been in relationship with Jesus. Something had changed about them to such a degree that it is was irresistible to effect and impact the people around them. So, embrace the metaphor of a sneeze, and see what wisdom is waiting for you in the pages of “Sneezing Jesus.”

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